Friday, 17 May 2013

Paul Myburgh



Where

Who

Paul Myburgh, a multiple award winning documentary film maker, has had a life-long commitment to Africa that transcends the boundaries of politics and ideologies.
This became evident years ago when he spent seven years of his life living amongst the !Gwi Kalahari Bushmen, becoming an integral part of this ancient African culture.
A result of this dedication was an internationally acclaimed documentary, 1985‘People of the Great Sandface’ produced for SURVIVAL ANGLIA UK. Widely regarded as a classic, this remarkable ethnographic study has won many awards and firmly established him as a respected film-maker world wide.
He is at present in the writing, production and publication of two books, and a music CD from this valuable archive of work.
Other Achievements:
  • An twenty-year involvement in South African Palaeoanthropology, and exclusive media access to the discovery and excavation of the famous ‘Little Foot’ fossil skeleton at Sterkfontein … a world first!
  • Produced and directed in the field of Palaeoanthropology, a seven half hour series on the origins of humanity called 'Our Common Ancestor'.
Recently developed and written 6x1 hour documentaries on ‘Human Evolution - Consciousness and Form' for the international market.
Myburgh’s expertise and experience, however, extends far beyond ethnography.
  • He did pioneering work in the television field of 'black' music in SA from 1976. Also in 1976, three half hour documentaries on the critical issue of ‘black education’ in South Africa - the disparities and the ramifications.
  • He directed and photographed numerous music documentaries, including the 'Welcome Mandela' music video, and 'Symphony in Soweto' (the origination of The Soweto String Quartet).
  • 1994 - Producer, Director, Editor, DOP for DISCOVERY Channel. USA.
  • Completed a one hour ‘Blue Chip Special’ on Crowned Eagles for National Geographic Television titled ‘TALON - The story of a true Eagle’. *Winner of the 2000 S.A.S.C. Gold and Visible Spectrum Award for cinematography.
  • 1995 – 2000; Producer, Director, Editor, Writer & narrator for NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC Natural History . Washington USA.
He has in his own right written and recorded music for television.
  • Produced and directed a five half-hour music series for SABC TV3 called 'Afrika Live from Tandoor’.
  • Produced and Directed Television inserts for both corporate and broadcast television … too numerous to mention.
  • Myburgh was instrumental in initiating Environmental TV programming in South Africa. Contributions include investigative films on Air Pollution, Hormone Herbicides, Seal Culling (Greenpeace), The Forestry Farce, Gill Netting, Toxic Waste and others.
  • For his work on the St. Lucia Wetland controversy, Paul was awarded the 1990 SAB Environmental Journalist of the Year Award by Dr Ian Player.
  • For DACEL (SA. dept. agriculture, conservation, environment & land affairs) three documentary films; The State of the Environment, Waste in Gauteng, and South African Marine Research.
  • As Director of Photography Myburgh has received the SASC Gold Award for three years and the Gold and Visible Spectrum Award 2000 for the achievement of excellence in cinematography in both Drama and Documentary.
  • 2004/5; Lecturer master students; Wits University Film, TV, Drama Dept.
Myburgh lectures on the First People by invitation at Schools, Universities and specialist institutions throughout the world.
  • ‘Prince of Whales’ Cambridge University Environment and Business – Guest speaker/facilitator.
  • 2007/2008/2009; Contracted as Creative Director and senior Director of Photography to earth-touch.com. Producing about 100 short natural history films during this period for broadcast and global new-media release.
  • 2010-2013; Completed book on the /Gwikwe bushman ‘The Bushman Winter Has Come’ - published by Penguin Books.
Current: Filming and writing of the story of the “Little Foot Excavation” in The Cradle of Humankind.
“We are here to contribute to the spiritual evolution of a free humanity in a one-world environment”

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